SEN Accomodations to expect

In this feature we focus on SEN accomodations.

Example SEN accommodation (for Progress Test)

Paper and Pencil Test

The following test accommodations are offered by GL Assessment: 

  • Scribe/transcribe
  • Prompt (prompting students to keep them on track)
  • Coloured overlay

GL Assessment also advise the following:

  • Reader (questions/instructions cannot be rephrased, support cannot be given for mathematical content such as numbers or symbols)
  • Additional time (Alternatively the test can be easily split into two sections and delivered over 2 sittings within a week, it is advised that Mental Maths aspects of the test are administered separately)
  • Rest break (not advised for Mental Maths subtest)
  • Enlargement (be aware of questions which require diagrams to be to scale)

Digital Test

The following test accommodations CAN be used with PTM Digital: 

  • Prompt (prompting students to keep them on track)
  • Coloured overlay

The following test accommodations CANNOT be used with PTM Digital: 

  • Reader (audio is provided for all relevant instructions. For students with a hearing impairment we recommend using the paper test where a Reader can be used)
  • Practical assistant (you may wish to consider using the paper version instead)
  • Enlargement (we recommend using the paper version for students who require enlargement)

The following test accommodations MIGHT be acceptable for use with PTM digital, please contact us for further details: 

  • Additional time (Alternatively the test can be easily split into two sections and delivered over 2 sittings within a week. It is advised that Mental Maths aspects of the test are administered separately. Student’s work will only be saved once the ‘End Test’ button has been selected so please consider this when planning timings)
  • Rest break (student’s work will only be saved once the ‘End Test’ button has been selected so please consider this when planning timings)

Timings

Students should be given as long as they need to complete it (apart from Mental Maths sections).

If there is anything about the tests that students don’t understand, they should ask. Teachers may give additional information on procedure and assist students in completing the front cover of their answer booklets.

Testing the cohort

The test should be given to all students in the relevant age group or class. However, if the test will cause distress to a student, or you are certain that a student will score no marks at all, then it is not necessary to include such students. Similarly, students should be encouraged to work through all of the test, but where you judge that it would be inappropriate for a student to continue, it is permissible for that student to stop.

Students who are absent on the day of testing may be tested later, if this is convenient for the school.

Special Educational Needs (SEN teaching)

Children and parents have struggled to adjust to homeschooling. Now, some have to cope with returning to schools which will seem very different to those they left at the beginning of lockdown. One group of children, though, are facing challenges beyond those experienced by the majority.

Children with special educational needs (SEN) make up around 15% of all pupils in mainstream education. Developmental dyslexia is the most common condition in this group, estimated to affect between 10%-16% of the UK population. Autism is much rarer, affecting about 1.1%.

Our research suggests that children with these conditions might find it especially difficult to adapt to changes in their education. We need to recognise the extra challenges homeschooling and online learning have posed for many children – and take this into account as schools reopen.

How to recognize children with SEN?

Children who either

  • Face difficulties while learning or suffer from any disabilities which hamper or put them into the strenuous situation compared to other children of the same age. Or
  • Might require special educational needs to think and understand things, some observe physically challenged or any sensory difficulties, some require emotional support, some require behavioral support, for some language and speech is the pain area.

Special educational needs are for those children who are facing difficulties with every work in school, understanding information, reading writing or calculus, they face difficulties while expressing themselves and difficulties in understanding others.

How to identify whether children require SEN?

Typically, through teachers’ observation.

What do I need to do as a good teacher?

Teachers who are dealing with children having special education needs or who are suffering from Dyslexia, usually have to go the extra mile, when they are caring for a child. The needs of these special children are not usual and their Special Educational Needs will come in handy. The codes have been updated by the children and their families back in 2014-2015. All schools should be referring to this code of practice while dealing with children under exceptional circumstances. 

The basic principles are that everyone has a right to education and to achieve their best and also become confident people and live a life that is not so different from other children of their age. Children with special academic needs often have a hard time transitioning into successful adults. Most of the time, these children are deprived of their rights to higher education. All the children that have special education needs should have their needs met in the very early stages, as they step foot into their schools or colleges.

What is SEN Support?

Previously, there used to be a school action and school action plus plan for holding special children, nowadays, that has been replaced with SEN support. This is a support mechanism specifically made for the students and young pupils who have special educational needs. Other support plans come alongside SEN support and one of the most important ones is EHCP which stands for education, health and care plan.

Some parents still tend to think that the child has special education requirements and they should contact the teacher of their school or SEN support group (SENCo.). The same goes for a teacher or the SEN support group, wherein they have concerns about whether they should be reaching out to contact a child or their parents to discuss the issues and difficulties and any kind of support that can be offered for them in terms of learning and education.

Multiple SEN Support stages

There are multiple stages for a better strategically approach or SEN support and they are;

  • Assess – assessing the difficulties that a child has faced and the right kind of support that can be provided to them. 
  • Planning – Planning is one of the most important steps. 
  • Tracking and reviewing – once a plan is in place, it is important that everyone from the support group puts a tracking mechanism in place that will define how well the plan is working. 

Programs for children with Dyslexia

Since Dyslexia does not just affect the educational progress of a child but ruptures their life from within and breaks their confidence, an effective program must be in place to make the children read and learn better. 

Phonetics assessment – the first year of education will focus on phonetics, which will include effective guidance and regular testing to determine how well the children are coping with the program.

Apprenticeship and functional skill-testing – there will be arrangements for testing function skills, which however are not under the governance of the JCQ regulations currently. 

Exam Access Arrangements

Without a doubt, students with dyslexia need certain special arrangements to make the whole reading and learning experience more preferable to their needs. In classrooms during examinations, certain favourable adjustments are required to be put in place for these students. 

All exam access arrangements usually include extra time for the completion of a paper. The use of an exam reading pen is something that will assist the students in reaching their true potential. Oftentimes, a word processor or any assisting software can also make the whole exam situation more comfortable for dyslexic students. These devices usually come with a screen reader or voice recognition software. 

GCSE and A-level examinations:

There is an education board of council that looks over the exam access arrangements for GCSE and A-level qualifications for these students. 

Firstly, the school knows that the student is acquainted with the support that the school is putting in place in the classrooms and also determining what is their ideal way of working. 

Secondly, there are many accessors for these students, so finding a sample assessment of these assessors is important. Thirdly, the requirement of the subjects that they are talking about.

Assessing special educational needs

There are many national curriculum testing programs that also help in identifying the special need. There are other ways as well to check if there is a special educational need for your child, such as telephonic tests, tests to observe if there is any problem specifically or difficulties in the individual’s movement. If the child has left one school and has moved to other than collecting records and feedback from there is a good idea. Checking closely if the child can meet the individual targets and is able to perform well in differentiated learning activities.

Organizing activities where the involvement of several psychological senses at a time gives an excellent result. Keeping a proper tab on the progress and the accomplishments of the student as per the national individual target. Scheduling and monitoring regular meetings with the pupil by analyzing the data maintained by the school management.

 

What to do if you have figured out that your child may have any difficulty?

The early years of the children are very crucial for their physical, psychological, cognitive, and social development. If the doctor has asked for a routine checkup schedule be alert that the doctor has observed any difficulty with your child and try to have a conversation with him/her to understand it more. If the little one is not yet going to school or any educational center, you can directly visit your doctor or the health visitor and they will guide you with the next strides for extra care and improvements.

 

What questions the parents should ask the teachers?

While interacting with the class teacher or the headteacher of your child, ask about the performance of your child compared to children of a similar age. Ask if they think your child faces any difficulties or he/she has special educational needs. Parents can also seek help from the parent partnership service available in their local authorities. They can go to child health services, social services, or any local voluntary organizations for seeking required assistance or guidance.

 

School provision for special educational needs 

The schools arrange systematic and evaluated motor programs; they give more time to the children with difficulties to complete the task. Giving rest breaks to children from time to time is also a part. Teachers arrange for the adaptive groupings.

The talk between the students and the teachers is in simplified form. Teachers often go for 1:1 support, depending on the need of the individual. The resources provided display that they support independence.

 

Extra SEN challenges

Many people think of dyslexia as a language disorder, but it also affects the memory and people’s ability to verbalise ideas and to pay attention. Even in the best of learning environments, struggles in school are likely to lead to low self-esteem for dyslexic children.

Sounds can be magnified, for example, making it hard for a child working at the kitchen table to drag their attention away from the ticking of a clock or the dripping of a tap. Their experience of “not fitting in” also affects their self-esteem.

Another aspect of autism is concrete, black and white thinking. Some autistic children struggle with homework because they think school is for work and home is for play. Routine and predictability is crucial for these children.

In school, autistic and dyslexic children would often have specialist support in place to help them with these problems. Without this kind of support, problems with attention and self-esteem may make learning at home very difficult.

 

SEN school attendance

Many autistic children, including those with a type of autism called pathological demand avoidance, are simply too anxious to attend school regularly.

Remote online education may offer children a greater opportunity for personalised learning at their own pace. For these reasons, many parents of SEN children choose to homeschool their children even under normal circumstances.

 SEN emotional and social development

  • Experts suggest that emotional and social development should take precedence over school work. Some children may need special help with this.
  • There are things that teachers and parents can do to help children deal with difficult emotions.
  • Children might also be dealing with bereavement and new financial insecurity at home. The involvement of other child specialists, like psychologists and social workers, might therefore be beneficial.
  • To help build a sense of control, we need to do more to help children with special educational needs succeed in school, respecting their own pace and learning styles.

Do I have dyslexia quiz – lucid test – dyslexia reading test

Dyslexia Reading Tests

GL Assessments distribute the Lucid test portfolio of reading tests used toidentify dyslexia.

Such reading tests are very useful in identifying potential and understanding learners’ strengths and weaknesses.

 

Lucid Test Battery Learners taking test

Different Lucid Tests Results

The Lucid test portfolio consists of 9 separate tests.

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid Test Exact 

Firstly, we consider the Lucid Test, called the Lucid Exact. This is a simple and time-efficient Access Arrangement screening for those between 11 and 24. The Lucid Reading Test assesses the following:

  • Speeded word recognition
  • Reading comprehension accuracy
  • Reading comprehension speed
  • Spelling
  • Handwriting speed
  • Typing speed

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid Rapid

Second, we consider the Lucid Test, called the Lucid Rapid provides a quick and accurate indication of dyslexia. 

The Lucid Rapid has 4 sub-tests:

  • Phonological processing (4 – 15 years)
  • Working memory (4 – 15 Years)
  • Phonic decoding skills (8 – 15 years)
  • Visual-verbal integration memory (4 – 7 years)

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid LADS Plus

Thirdly, let’s consider the LADS Plus. This Lucid test provides a fast, accurate and objective identification of dyslexia in the general population over 15. 

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid CoPS

The CoPs is a child-friendly dyslexia screening that is suitable for children between 4 and 8 years. Teachers can use the CoPS to identify dyslexia and many other learning difficulties. Thus, the CoPs is a very widely used tool worldwide. It comprises of 9 tests, each presented as an attractive and fun game that takes about 5 minutes. Total administration time is 45 minutes.

The tests assess:

  • Phonological awareness
  • Phoneme discrimination
  • Auditory short-term memory
  • Visual short-term memory
  • Visual and verbal sequencing

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid LASS

Now, let’s consider the Lucid Test, called the Lucid LASS. This Lucid test identifies dyslexic tendencies and other learning needs in children between 8 and 16. It is available in 2 versions. Firstly, for learners 8-11. Second, for those aged between 11 and 15 years of age.

Lucid Test Reading – Do I have dyslexia – dyslexia reading test

LASS assesses:

  • Firstly, visual memory
  • Secondly, auditory-verbal memory
  • Thirdly, phonic reading skills
  • Fourthly,Phonological processing ability
  • Fifth, single-word reading
  • Next, sentence reading
  • Then, spelling
  • Finally, reasoning

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid Recall

Next, the Lucid Test called the Lucid Recall is an effective assessment of working memory. It can have many applications in the classroom but is most effective in identifying children who require intervention.

The Lucid Test Recall has 3 subtests. Firstly, the phonological loop – assessed by a word recall test. 

Secondly, the visuospatial sketchpad – assessed by a pattern recall test. 

Thirdly, the central executive function – assessed by a counting recall test

So we know this measures processing speed, but not working memory.

Lucid Reading Test – Lucid ViSS

Next, the Lucid Test called the ViSS helps identify those who suffer from visual stress.

So, what is visual stress? Visual stress is also called ‘Meares-Irlen Syndrome’ or ‘Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome’ and it is the experience of unpleasant visual symptoms when reading.

In our opinion, these symptoms can vary greatly and include movement and colour in text, distortions of the print, illusions of shape, loss of print clarity and general visual irritation.

As this assessment is only 20 – 30 minutes long it can be very useful as a quick diagnostic. The results not only give a reliable indication of the existence and severity of visual stress but also identify who may benefit from colour overlays or tinted lenses to minimise the symptoms

Lucid Memory Booster

The Lucid Memory Booster takes about 30-40 minutes to complete and has 6 levels, increasing in difficulty. Each level teaches a different memory strategy.  Worth knowing that the Lucid Memory Booster is also available for home use.

Lucid Comprehension Booster

Finally, the Lucid Comprehension Booster provides a fun way to increase reading and listening comprehension skills.

What are special educational needs?

  • Children who face difficulties while learning or suffer from any disabilities which hamper or put them into the strenuous situation compared to other children of the same age.
  • Children might require a special educational needs teacher to help their:
    • Understanding
    • Physical challenges
    • Sensory difficulties
    • Emotional support
    • Behavioral support
    • Speech or reading.
  • Special educational needs are for those children who are facing difficulties with school work, understanding information, reading and/or writing..

Lucid Test Reading – Do I have dyslexia – dyslexia reading test

 

Is an SEN teacher required?

There are different ways of checking if there is a special educational need for a specific child: telephonic tests; observation; problem-solving difficulties or difficulties in the individual’s movement.

If the child has left one school and has moved to other than collecting records and feedback from there is a good idea. Checking closely if the child can meet the individual targets and is able to perform well in differentiated learning activities.

Organizing activities where the involvement of several psychological senses at a time gives an excellent result. Keeping a proper tab on the progress and the accomplishments of the student as per the national individual target.

Scheduling and monitoring regular meetings with the pupil by analyzing the data maintained by the school management.

 

What to do if your child requires an SEN teacher

  • The early years of the children are very crucial for their physical, psychological, cognitive, and social development.
  • If the doctor has asked for a routine checkup schedule be alert that the doctor has observed any difficulty with your child and try to have a conversation with him/her to understand it more.
  • In fact, you can directly visit your doctor or the health visitor and they will guide you with the next strides for extra care and improvements.

 

What parents should ask their SEN teacher?

While interacting with the class teacher or the headteacher of your child, ask about the performance of your child compared to children of a similar age. Ask if they think your child faces any difficulties or he/she has special educational needs.

Parents can also seek help from the parent partnership service available in their local authorities. They can go to child health services, social services, or any local voluntary organizations for seeking required assistance or guidance.

Typical special educational needs provision

The schools arrange systematic and evaluated motor programs; they give more time to the children with difficulties to complete the task. Giving rest breaks to children from time to time is also a part. Teachers arrange for the adaptive groupings.

The talk between the students and the teachers is in simplified form. Teachers often go for 1:1 support, depending on the need of the individual.

 

Lucid Test Reading – Do I have dyslexia – dyslexia reading test